Cat Care in Colder Months - Woofs & Wags - Pet Lodge
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Cat Care in Colder Months

Cat Care - Woofs and Wags

Cat Care in Colder Months

If your cat enjoys the outdoors, then there are a few things to keep in mind as the temperatures drop. While cats are adept at taking care of themselves and finding food and shelter in even the most hostile conditions, the cliché about cats having nine lives indicates that some of these “cat tricks” might not be safe for your pet. Keep your cat warm and safe this winter with these cat care tips.

Ensuring Proper Cat Care in the Winter

For cats who primarily live outdoors, construct a dry, insulated shelter for them. If you’re handy, consider a little cat house on sturdy stilts, to keep the cold ground from dropping the inside temperature. The stilts have an added bonus as scratching posts, and the interior can hold food and water as well as warm blankets.

Indoor/outdoor cats need to be protected from the elements, too. Make sure that your pet door is properly sealed, to prevent drafts, and ensure that your cats have plenty of water. As the mercury drops, it’s easier for animals to become dehydrated. Check for ice in the morning and at night if you have outdoor water bowls. You may notice an increase in your cat’s appetite as well, so adjust their feeding as needed.

When you take care of your home and vehicles this winter, make sure that you cat-proof your garage, driveway, cars, and anywhere else cats might venture on your property. Tap on your hood before starting your car, and don’t forget to check tire wells, too. Make sure that your extra anti-freeze is tightly closed and stored in a closed cabinet that cats can’t get into. Check your car for antifreeze leaks, as well, as the perceived sweetness is appealing to curious cats and tasting it can be deadly. When you clear the snow and ice from your drive, use a shovel instead of chemical snowmelt. Be careful of any rock salt that you use as a de-icer, as well, as it can hurt tender cat paws and ingesting it can lead to dehydration and sickness.

Although your furry friend may have “nine lives,” it’s not a great idea to test that. Keep your pet warm and safe this winter, and make sure that you have plenty of food and water, as well as the number of on-call and after hours vet services, just in case.

If you have questions about dog or cat care, then contact Woofs and Wags, Baltimore. Get in touch here to learn more about this facility and the services that are provided here.

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